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The Pavilia Hill embraces the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi

by Sophie Cullen on Dec 28, 2016 in Lifestyle
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All images courtesy of New World Development

All images courtesy of New World Development

A new residential development in Hong Kong, The Pavilia Hill from New World Development, embraces the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi

Derived from Buddhist teachings, wabi-sabi accepts the natural cycle of birth and decay and finds beauty in the irregularities of impermanence. It looks to trim away any excesses to reveal the simplicity beneath, and incorporates elements such as asymmetry and symbolism. Although the aesthetic is often described as the beauty of the incomplete, today, it is widely adopted in the worlds of architecture and design.

Located in Hong Kong's historic Tin Hau district, The Pavilia Hill is the first residential development in the region to imbue the concept into its design. As the project's chief planner, executive vice-chairman and joint general manager of New World Development Adrian Cheng envisioned the property to be a pavilion-like form, seamlessly merging into the adjacent hillside.

The interior spaces incorporate a selection of natural materials that have been minimally altered from their original states

The interior spaces incorporate a selection of natural materials that have been minimally altered from their original states

"When I was furthering my studies in Kyoto, the city's rich culture and heritage, its verdant environs and the calming note from temple bells lulled me into deep meditations, through which I submerged myself into the world of deep, philosophical thought," explains Cheng. "I had the vision of bringing this mesmerising cultural experience into all my projects from that time onwards. The Pavilia Hill is indeed an actualisation of a dream."

To bring this dream to life, he tasked two leading Japanese designers with the project. Renowned landscape architect Shunmyo Masuno crafted the setting for the development, creating a serene oasis within the heart of Hong Kong. Inspired by the hillside location of the project, Masuno has mimicked rolling hills throughout the garden, demonstrating the beauty of the natural surroundings.

Landscape architect Shunmyo Masuno believes that gardens are special places where the mind dwells, so he handpicked five stone sculptures to heighten the tranquil effect

Landscape architect Shunmyo Masuno believes that gardens are special places where the mind dwells, so he handpicked five stone sculptures to heighten the tranquil effect

Additionally, Singapore-based Japanese interior designer Koichiro Ikebucho was selected to design the clubhouse for the project. Throughout the public areas, he has chosen to showcase the natural expression of different materials while deliberately avoiding any unnecessary decoration, to bring out the understated beauty of nature in every detail.

This is an excerpt from the "Perfect Imperfections” article from the December 2016 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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