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Making sense

by Teresa Chow on Jun 1, 2015 in Lifestyle
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As part of the programme for HKMS, artist Szabotage revamped a traditional green hawker's hut in the SoHo area with an image inspired by DJ Kulu (Photo by Chris Lau)

As part of the programme for HKMS, artist Szabotage revamped a traditional green hawker's hut in the SoHo area with an image inspired by DJ Kulu (Photo by Chris Lau)

According to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, "if you just work on stuff that you like and you're passionate about, you don't have to have a master plan" — and this is precisely the driving motivation behind homegrown creative events group Hong Kong Makes Sense

It would be no exaggeration to say that Hong Kong is a city where creativity is never in short supply, despite the naysayers still describing it as 'a cultural desert'. But from turning salvaged wood into an art installation (like artist Wong Tin Yan's Touch Wood exhibition at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum) to attracting international attention (like when renowned French artist Invader staged his latest exhibition at PMQ), the territory's burgeoning art and creative scene is clearly thriving.

This is clearly evident at a series of events which took place every Saturday evening throughout last September: dubbed 'Hong Kong Makes Sense' (HKMS), the concept was devised by Philip Lai, one of Perspective's 40 Under 40 winners in 2013, in close collaboration with Ah Shek, Vivian Lam and Chris Lau.

The official Hong Kong Makes Sense poster (Photo by Chris Lau)

The official Hong Kong Makes Sense poster (Photo by Chris Lau)

HKMS invited participants and audience "to experience unique moments created by artists, designers and performers (both professional and amateur), who stage their works without restriction to showcase the best of their creations," Lai explains.

From paintings to photography, music performances and fashion shows, HKMS has already literally provided a platform for many of the participants showing their works for the very first time. Housed in a three-storey, pre-war tong-lau in Central dating back nearly 100 years, Sense 99 is a music bar whose owners are, for the most part, just like Ah Shek himself. Having been involved in Hong Kong's creative scene for a long time, they were the group of artists who created the Cattle Depot Artists Village in 2001, turning a slaughterhouse into a home for the territory's art groups.

Vivian Lam, one of the core members of HKMS, created a display of photographs taken when she visited temples in Japan as part of her 'journey of meditation' (Photo by Chris Lau)

Vivian Lam, one of the core members of HKMS, created a display of photographs taken when she visited temples in Japan as part of her ‘journey of meditation’ (Photo by Chris Lau)


This is a preview of the "Making sense” article from the June 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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