SEARCH

‘Can-made’ architecture: Sculptures made from canned food showcased at Canstruction Hong Kong

by Peace Chiu on Apr 29, 2015 in Lifestyle
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on Sina WeiboShare on Tencent WeiboEmail this to someone
A sculpture of the Sydney Opera House, designed by City University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering and Black&White (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of the Sydney Opera House, designed by City University of Hong Kong, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering and Black&White (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

Hundreds of creative minds recently showcased their 'can-made' (and handmade) versions of famous architectural pieces from around the world at Canstruction Hong Kong

Three hundred architects, designers, professors, students and lamas recently gathered at Canstruction Hong Kong to build iconic world attractions out of cans of food.

Held at PMQ, the competition not only served as a platform for teams to showcase their design talents, but also an opportunity to raise awareness of hunger issues in Hong Kong. More than 52,000 cans of food — a record high — were used to build the architectural pieces.

The winner of both the CanstructionHK 2015 Best Design Award and the Juror's Favourite Award was 'Above the Clouds' — a sculpture of the Big Buddha at Lantau Island in Hong Kong, designed by Airport Authority Hong Kong. The team was led by Colin Ridley, senior manager of architecture projects at Airport Authority Hong Kong, and also comprised three other architects and one engineer. They used more than 10,000 cans of food and has spent over two months to plan and build the sculpture. 'Above the Clouds' will represent Hong Kong in the international Canstruction competition.

770_5DF_9143

‘Above the Clouds’, designed by Airport Authority Hong Kong (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

Another sculpture that was well-received by the public was the 'Temple of Heaven' designed by design firm Benoy. The artwork was inspired by the Temple of Heaven in Beijing and made using more than 5,000 cans of food.

A sculpture of the Temple of Heaven, designed by Benoy and Ayam Brand (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of the Temple of Heaven, designed by Benoy and Ayam Brand (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

“Canstruction combines competition and exhibition into a fun way to help alleviate hunger and malnutrition in our communities,” said Caribbean Chan, chief executive of Food Angel, organiser of Canstruction Hong Kong. "This is our the third year hosting Canstruction, and we are glad that the scale has been growing every year, raising more awareness of hunger issues in Hong Kong."

Other famous attractions featured at the event included the Sydney Opera House, Big Ben, Great Wall of China, Moai Statues and Swayambhunath Stupa.

A sculpture of Big Ben, designed by Art Projects Gallery (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of Big Ben, designed by Art Projects Gallery (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

770_5DF_9045

The Great Wall of China, designed by Giving Love (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of one Moai Statue, designed by Fossil Group (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of one Moai Statue, designed by Fossil Group (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of the Swayambhunath Stupa, designed by Thrangu Tensheng Tsokpa, Nepal and Thrangu Vajrayana Buddhist Centre, Hong Kong (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

A sculpture of the Swayambhunath Stupa, designed by Thrangu Tensheng Tsokpa, Nepal and Thrangu Vajrayana Buddhist Centre, Hong Kong (Photo courtesy of Canstruction Hong Kong)

All canned foods used to build the structures are donated to Food Angel and its partnering food banks, and ultimately redistributed to the underprivileged communities across Hong Kong free of charge.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

  • ronewyork-02

    Architecting energy


    Discovering how feng shui is becoming an increasingly common consideration in architectural projects worldwide

    Posted on Feb 15, 2018
    View
  • One Crown Place will feature a luxury Georgian hotel, from six restored townhouses

    Timeless terrace


    London's One Crown Place development set to open new luxury hotel to launch in 2020

    Posted on Feb 14, 2018
    View
  • DSC_9941 copy

    Bohemian rhapsody


    Lasvit celebrates a decade of revitalising and reimagining traditional Czech glassmaking, for the modern world

    Posted on Feb 12, 2018
    View
  • LukeFox48

    Test of time


    Architect Luke Fox chats with Perspective about working in Asia and Europe and designing for the present and future as he celebrates 20 years at at Foster + Partners.

    Posted on Feb 8, 2018
    View
Top