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Roy David Studio creates a space for two companies in Tel Aviv

by Kiefer McKenzie on Nov 12, 2015 in Interiors
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At the desks, black-painted metal pipes which drop down from the ceiling perform more than just an aesthetic
function, as wires providing electricity and telecoms run through them to the workspaces (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

At the desks, black-painted metal pipes which drop down from the ceiling perform more than just an aesthetic function, as wires providing electricity and telecoms run through them to the workspaces (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

In an industrial-style loft in Tel Aviv, Roy David Studio creates a space for two separate companies in which to share, dream, imagine and create

Two separate companies occupying a shared space under the same roof with the same founders, Jelly Button Games and Hamutzim Studio are both housed in an industrial-style loft located in southern Tel Aviv, a district well known for its 'low-fi' urban style.

Jelly Button Games, founded in 2011, is a free-to-play mobile game company. Known for its 'Mingle Player Experience', the firm produces games in their entirety from the beginning stages of development through to design. Hamutzim Studio, on the other hand, is an interface design studio that helps entrepreneurs reach their goals. In their own words, "through innovation and creativity, we try to move people, every chance we get."

The raw concrete flooring, a dominant feature in the shared space, occasionally gives way to wooded floorboards to denote different functions in different areas (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

The raw concrete flooring, a dominant feature in the shared space, occasionally gives way to wooded floorboards to denote
different functions in different areas (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

It is clear to see, then, that these two companies required a space that nurtured and inspired creativity. Originally used as a home and an artist's studio, their new shared office measures 700 sq-m and boasts ceilings of an impressive 3.5m in height. Having looked over the initial brief, Roy David, founder of his eponymously named architecture and interior design studio, identified the main challenge: to construct a workspace that would give both creative companies the solitude and functional privacy they required, while also creating an environment that inspires its occupants to share, dream, imagine and create.

Cleverly laid out to include intimate nooks for smaller groups, the space manages to achieve different levels of privacy in a somewhat open environment (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

Cleverly laid out to include intimate nooks for smaller groups, the space manages to achieve different levels of privacy in a
somewhat open environment (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

The initial idea was to create a three-segment design plan that shows a transition from public areas to semi-public to private. The design resembles the ripple effect, with the public area serving as a centre for sharing and inspiring interaction amongst staff. As the ripples continue and begin to fade, the private areas would be found, located on the periphery of the office. These areas have various office functions such as meeting rooms, a gaming room and workspaces — the design also helps to accentuate the centre of the workspace, making it a bustling focal point within the structure.

Famous street artists native to Tel Aviv were invited to paint the existing support columns (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

Famous street artists native to Tel Aviv were invited to paint the existing support columns (Photography: © Yoav Gurin)

The entire area is divided into two levels by three wooden stairs, which help to separate the work areas. However, this still allows for people to visually communicate; the idea was to create an area that was open and transparent yet divided by freestanding wooden walls. These allow the different spaces to be woven into each other, while providing privacy that the staff desire through a sequential environment.

This is an excerpt from the "Two Companies, One Roof” article from the November 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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