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Ontology has created a modern take on the traditional massage studio

by Leona Liu on Sep 30, 2016 in Interiors
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All images courtesy Ontology

All images courtesy Ontology

Finger Talks is a massage studio and cafe staffed by visually-impaired employees, and Ontology has created an idyllic work space for both the staff and their clients in Taipei

Taiwanese interior design studio Ontology has built a strong reputation for making changes through design, growing the practice on a foundation of their core value — that design changes people's lives. So when the owner of Finger Talks aspired to create a relaxing haven amid the busting city and abandon the stereotype of massage studios offering therapies by blind masseurs, he knew who to call.

In the dining area, minimalist furniture, bold colour contrasts and copper pendant lights signal a modern lifestyle concept leagues away from the dark, oldfashioned tones of a traditional massage outlet

In the dining area, minimalist furniture, bold colour contrasts and copper pendant lights signal a modern lifestyle concept leagues away from the dark, oldfashioned tones of a traditional massage outlet

With their experience in helping local business to build spaces and brands according to a new living philosophy, the interior designers at Ontology conceived a vivid, spiritually happy arena for Finger Talks' visually-impaired employees — the very opposite of their monochromatic world. Thus, warm, vibrant pastels from a Scandinavian colour palette were used to soften the rooms and create a welcoming ambience.

Bright, chromatic-geometric patterns yield a joyful atmosphere that delights guests upon entering the store. In the restrooms, instead of standard-sized tiles, the designers opted for smaller mosaic patterns to devise different backdrops. In the dining area, minimalist furniture, bold colour contrasts and copper pendant lights signal a modern lifestyle concept leagues away from the dark, old-fashioned tones of a traditional massage outlet.

The braille element is further transformed into round dots and shapes seen on wall hangers and door handles

The braille element is further transformed into round dots and shapes seen on wall hangers and door handles

On the wall, a quote by Andy Warhol — "They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself" — is also presented in the form of braille for the benefit of the outlet's blind staff. The inspiration provided by the raised dots and patterns of braille can also be seen details such as the wall hangers and door handles.

This is an excerpt from the “Design for Change" article from the October 2016 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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