• SUBSCRIBE NOW
SEARCH

Little Creatures brewery and restaurant by Charlie & Rose

by Sophie Cullen on Dec 2, 2016 in Interiors , Lifestyle
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on Sina WeiboShare on Tencent WeiboEmail this to someone
Photography: © Dicky Liu

Photography: © Dicky Liu

Charlie & Rose has created the perfect home-away-from-home in Hong Kong for Australian craft beer brewery Little Creatures

The story of Little Creatures goes back to the year 2000, when four friends decided they wanted to create a product around their passion: beer. They purchased two old sheds right on the fishing boat harbour in Fremantle (which had previously been used as a crocodile farm) and opened a small brewery and a restaurant seating 150 people.

Fast-forward to present day and the original brewery/restaurant has extended to accommodate almost 2,000 guests, making it the second biggest tourist attraction in the region.

The brewing kits are exposed behind the bar so that guests can see the beer-making process unfold, while the red pipes pump the finished product around the space

The brewing kits are exposed behind the bar so that guests can see the beer-making process unfold, while the red pipes pump the finished product around the space

"The company has always been based on a passion to make bloody good beer," explains Stewart Wheeler, GM of hospitality for Little Creatures. "Craft beer in Australia is approaching 15 per cent of the total market volume and
growing aggressively, as it is in every other modern western country. Asia is at about three per cent, but growing faster than any other market."

So the cross-continent move seemed logical for the company, though not without its challenges and difficulties, not least of which being space. "We needed a big space. For our business model we needed 500 sq-m with four metre-high ceilings to accommodate the brewing equipment. We also wanted little glimpses of the harbour and a quiet, leafy street in front with wide sidewalks, and of course the real estate agents were like, 'Are you joking?'," muses Wheeler.

Luckily, however, one day the team was wandering alongside the waterfront in Kennedy Town, a suburb that they had recently fallen in love with, and noticed an open roller door fronting a huge space. The former sugar and flour warehouse seemed the perfect location for the operation, so the owners were approached, and the rest is history.

Decorated pegboards were installed throughout the venue to break up the large wall expanses and conceal acoustic panelling

Decorated pegboards were installed throughout the venue to break up the large wall expanses and conceal acoustic panelling

"We see ourselves as custodians of the site, so we haven't tried to change the fabric of the building. Instead, we've protected the original volumes of the space and tried to make our concept fit within those," Wheeler explains. "For instance, although we've obviously needed to build new kitchens and bars and things, we haven't physically altered the building to accommodate those. All of the columns existed previously, and we just clad them and increased them in size slightly to help improve the intimacy of the space."

The floors, walls and ceilings were not touched at all during the transformation, creating a raw foundation for the interiors. Red pipes that run around the ceiling heighten this industrial feel, and also function to move the beer around the premises. To juxtapose the warehouse aesthetic, design firm Charlie & Rose chose communal tables made from timber and leather upholstered furniture to stand the test of the time. They also wanted to ensure that guests would be surprised at the level of comfort available in the highly industrial space.

The large dining area features long-lasting materials such as leather-upholstered furniture and communal timber dining tables

The large dining area features long-lasting materials such as leather-upholstered furniture and communal timber dining tables

As the original building had such large wall expanses, the team had to get creative to ensure a warm and inviting atmosphere. "We always place importance on this. It's done by offering customers choice in terms of different seating types, sizes, heights etcetera, and identifying and controlling different nooks within the space via varied ceiling heights, changing materials, feature lighting and utilising inherent building character," notes fellow Australian Ben McCarthy of Charlie & Rose.

As a result, polished concrete, copper, stone, marble and timber can be seen throughout the project. The team also brought over a number of vintage items from Australia that add the perfect homey touches. Coloured German pottery sits next to vintage work benches and sideboards, and a trio of chairs from Melbourne's Forum Theatre even make an appearance at the entrance of the space.

This is an excerpt from the "Aussie Rules” article from the December 2016 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

, , , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

  • Main photo updated

    Incubation architecture


    BARRIE HO Architecture hosts exhibitions about incubation architecture at the Royal Institute of British Architects, London – and soon in Hong Kong

    Posted on Sep 21, 2017
    View
  • Frank Leung surveys his creation at ArtisTree

    Dramatic art


    Hong Kong art space ArtisTree transformed into a dynamic open-box concept performance venue

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
  • 1

    Land Lord


    Landscape designer and architect Raddle Siddeley on why landscapes should look great naked

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
  • Square and boxy, internally House W tells a story of soaring ceilings, vast skylights and an entire wall composed of glass panels on the garden elevation

    Heat exchange


    House W in Beijing overcomes challenges of heat insulation for maximum energy efficiency

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
Top