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Less is more

by TERESA CHOW on Oct 7, 2010 in Interiors
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Gemma Fletcher of Lagranja Design tells Perspectiveglobal how she transformed the tiny space of a Barcelona shoe shop and infused it with weekend style

When it comes to small retail spaces, creating a clean, uncluttered spatial composition is easier said than done. At a shoe shop in Barcelona, however, space was not the main issue for Lagranja Design, which knows a trick or two about drawing customers’ eyes to focus on merchandise as well as fanciful surroundings.
 
What was the concept behind the design of the shop?
The shoe brand Aro belongs to the Vialis group, which specialises in high quality ‘weekend sneakers’. As the brand is well known for its design, a richness in materials and an emphasis on craftsmanship, our design was to be faithful to these qualities.
With limited space, we wanted to express these ideals and, so, the concept was to create a very ‘human’ boutique using natural finishes. Our aim was to utilise every corner of the sore with subtle design touches and we did this through the use of colours, mirrors and unusual animal footprints/human prints/bike tracks on the walls.
 
The walls are clean but the floors are colourful, why?
The colour scheme was primarily white walls and multicoloured flooring using grey, red and a straw colour. We wanted to use earthy colours to create an inviting, comfortable atmosphere. The white backdrop made the collage of the doormats on the floor stand out a lot more.
 
Tell us about the rich texture of the interior.
The walls are a raw plaster painted white with bike tracks, birds’ feet and shoe prints embedded in the walls. The flooring is made from multicoloured and multi-textured door mats and is the only element of the design which uses colour. The lighting is quite bright, purposely to highlight the tracks and prints on the wall, creating interesting shadows. The shelving and the cash register are made from cork and the seating is by Jasper Morrison for Vitra and also made from cork. The mirror skirting board is higher than usual and doubles as a mirror for viewing the footwear as well as giving the illusion that the flooring is infinite.
 
What about the lighting scheme?
The main aim with the lighting was to illuminate the walls to highlight the shadows of the prints on the wall. The flooring is illuminated using hidden lighting under the shelving, which also gives better visibility of the shoes when customers are trying on.
 
What do you like most about the design?
The use of the prints and tracks through the plaster walls and special use of lighting that highlights this.
 
Lagranja Design

 

 

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