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Special Promotional Feature

HKIDA launches fifth stage of RIDA project

by on Jul 15, 2015 in Interiors , Special Promotional Feature
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New members with HKIDA membership chairwoman  Louisa Young (centre)

New members with HKIDA membership chairwoman Louisa Young (centre)

The fifth stage of the Hong Kong Interior Design Association's (HKIDA) Registered Interior Designers Association Project was recently launched, aiming to implement professional guidelines for the benefit of the industry, local interior designers and the public in general

In the company of a range of Hong Kong's best-known interior designers and practitioners at the end of June, Horace Pan, chairman of the Registered Interior Designers Association (RIDA) Project and vice-chairman of the Hong Kong Interior Design Association (International affairs) was joined by HKIDA membership chairwoman Louisa Young to introduce the details of the scheme and its impact on the industry, local interior designers and the public in general.

Horace Pang introduces the scheme to invited guests from the industry

Horace Pang, chairman of the RIDA project, introduces the scheme to invited guests from the industry

Pan said the emphasis of the fifth stage is to implement the Professional Guidelines for the Interior Design Industry in Hong Kong — Education & Practice under the fourth stage of the same RIDA project. The two-year span of the stage includes master talks, continuing education, interior design guidelines/textbooks and a mentorship programme.

According to Young, the stage is modelled on a three-part structure that encompasses education and professional experience. Those wishing to enter the interior design field are advised to acquire four years of relevant education:

Part 1: a two-year higher diploma course or associate degree in interior design; or
Part 2: a four-year bachelor's degree in interior design, or
Part 1 + a two-year top-up Bachelor's degree;
plus
Part 3: two years of professional experience under the direction of a qualified mentor, during which practitioners are required to acquire the knowledge listed out in Part 3 and fill out a logbook documenting their professional experience.

Guests, members and staff took time after the event to share their thoughts on the programme

Guests, members and staff took time after the event to share their thoughts on the programme

At the end of the two years, this logbook should be submitted to the HKIDA for evaluation. Once approved, practitioners will be entitled to describe themselves as HKIDA Qualified Professional Interior Designers.

Funded by the Hong Kong government's CreateSmart Initiative in 2015, Young declared the Mentorship programme officially launched. Invitations are being sent to relevant interior designers and graduates to participate into the programme.

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