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Bigger and brighter

by Teresa Chow on Dec 16, 2010 in Interiors
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In line with its principles of ergonomics and functionality, Leicht’s brand new showroom heralds a unique kitchen design experience

 
Renowned for his showroom designs for Hugo Boss, Hartmut Raiser, Leicht’s chief designer and founder of his own studio, Raiserlopes Designers, sat down with PerspectiveGlobal to talk about his work on the brand’s new Hong Kong showroom. Located in one of Wanchai’s prominent business centres, the site oversees Victoria Harbour, offering views few other kitchen brands in Hong Kong can boast.
 
Given your wealth of experience in showroom design, what would you say are the winning elements to include?
It has to be a space which is open to the public, to showcase the collections and the brands in a nice space, and show the main elements that everyone wants to see.
 
Before designing the Leicht HK showroom, how did you define the space?
I like the rough style and the rustic ceiling this showroom presented. The huge space embracing one of the most beautiful views of Hong Kong – Victoria Harbour – was most attractive.
 
How did you come to collaborate with Leicht?
The chairman of Leicht Stefan Waldenmaier and I both come from Germany. As we have worked for fashion and, increasingly, for kitchen brands, we believe we can bring new ideas and innovative design together, and to make kitchens look more fashionable.
 
How would you compare kitchen design today with that of 10 years ago, prior your entering the business?
There’s a big difference. In the past, a kitchen was just a kitchen; now, it’s a lifestyle product. Designs have changed tremendously, from being just a box-like set-up with straight lines to a space which has become the core element of a house.
 
In your opinion, what are keys to today’s kitchen design?
Leicht’s kitchens use solid material, solid accessories and good separation to achieve stylish design and functionality, because functionality and durability are keys to today’s kitchen design. We intentionally removed some decorative elements to create a more minimalistic design that fits the principle of durability.
Kitchen design is an evolution, not revolution. It can be stylish, but in terms of investment, it is more long-term and bigger investment than clothing.
In our latest series, we used a lot of natural materials; wood is a major element as it tends to be more elegant, intensive and individual. We chose wood because it can again achieve the function of durability.
 

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