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The Arctic: Architecture and Extreme Environments

by Sophie Cullen on Oct 26, 2015 in Architecture
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Students and Mr. Garcia celebrate the opening of the exhibition (Photo by Dicky Liu)

Students and Mr. Garcia celebrate the opening of the exhibition (Photo by Dicky Liu)

Hong Kong Design Institute (HKDI) and The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, along with Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education (IVE) (Lee Wai Lee) present The Arctic: Architecture and Extreme Environments until February 2016

Last year, a group of Master’s students trekked to the Arctic to research the area with a view to improving architectural performance in the extreme conditions. Lead by the Head of Architecture at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, David A. Garcia,  the journey took the student to Iceland, Greenland and Svalbard and gave them unique glimpse of what life is like in such remote areas.

The exhibition shows a range of the devices created during the project as well as the architectural outcomes (Photo by Dicky Liu)

The exhibition shows a range of the devices created during the project as well as the architectural outcomes (Photo by Dicky Liu)

The students then had to design a device in response to the environment, something that harnessed elements of nature and the idea of sustainability, while also offering a new solution to common problems. The designs ranged from utilising wind power to expand levers to creating batteries with salt and snow to generate power. “Students learn so much through being in this radically different landscape,” said Mr. Garcia at the opening of the exhibition. “They don’t have books and the internet to rely on. They have to think for themselves.”

This device harnesses wind power to open, and could potentially be used as a canopy on a building (Photo by Dicky Liu)

This device harnesses wind power to open, and could potentially be used as a canopy on a building (Photo by Dicky Liu)

In the final stage of their project, students had to incorporate their device into an architectural structure that would be located in one of the regions that they had previously visited. Industrial plants, restaurants and mixed-use buildings were just some of the outcomes.

The final architectural projects had to sit within the extreme environment and utilise elements of the students' device (Photo by Dicky Liu)

The final architectural projects had to sit within the extreme environment and utilise elements of the students’ device (Photo by Dicky Liu)

HKDI is currently exhibiting the works at their Experience Center. Visitors can see the devices and the final architectural models along with footage of the expedition and a range of infographics on the different countries.

Details

The Arctic: Architecture and Extreme Environments

Date: 23 October, 2015 – 22 February, 2016

Time: 10am – 8pm (Closed on Tuesday)

Venue: C002 –Experience Center, HKDI & IVE (Lee Wai Lee), 3 King Ling Road, Tseung Kwan O (Tiu Keng Leng Station A2 exit)

Enquiry: 3928 2566

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