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PERFECTLY INCOMPLETE

by Michele Koh Morollo on Nov 28, 2012 in Architecture , Interiors
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Seya House by Suppose Design Office is an experimental home that brings to light the perfection and versatility of ambiguous spaces

The home of a young family of three, Seya House in Yokohama blurs the boundaries between yard, garden and home. With both the couple working as florists, their wish was for a home that would accommodate a wide variety of flowers and plants, and be “surrounded by nature”.

Japanese architecture studio Suppose Design Office (SDO) was assigned the challenge, creating an amazing exploratory space that examines the notion of scale within architecture and nature. SDO director Makoto Tanijiri started with the idea of bringing nature into the home, working around the idea of spaces where flowers and plants would thrive and exist in aesthetic harmony. Situated on a relatively small plot of just over 73 sq-m in a residential neighbourhood, the 36 sq-m Seya House includes an experimental space that is neither a conventional room nor a standard yard, but was designed to function as an “incomplete”, a morphing space that would change over time. 

Tanjiri and his team built the exterior shell of the house in the form of a giant timber and plywood shed, and enclosed within it a double-height space in the front that acts as a buffer zone between the exterior and interior zones. “It is the norm to erect walls to enclose a space for a building, but for the house in Seya we decided to enclose the outer space. This resulted in the creation of a space that is neither a garden nor a room,” says Tanjiri.

The concept behind the design was to find the relationship between architecture and nature by manipulating the scale of architecture in a scale-less natural environment. “It is important to have a sense of scale in architecture. When there is no scale, the space is open and when that condition is analysed, one sees that it is similar to the natural environment, where there is no scale. The concept came from the thought of taking away scale from architecture and adding scale to nature,” he explains.

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