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Messner Mountain Museum

by Suzanne Miao on Dec 1, 2015 in Architecture
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Informed by the shards of rock and ice of the surrounding landscape, concrete canopies have been cast in-situ and rise from the ground at MMM_Corones (Image courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects)

Informed by the shards of rock and ice of the surrounding landscape, concrete canopies have been cast in-situ and rise from the ground at MMM_Corones (Image courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects)

Reinhold Messner's sixth and last museum in Corones is the fruit of an extraordinary collaboration between three parties at the peak of their specialised areas: Messner the mountaineer; Skirama Kronplatz as leader in mountain tourism; and Zaha Hadid, star of contemporary architecture

Embedded within the summit of Mount Kronplatz, 2,275m above sea level at the centre of South Tyrol's most popular ski resort, the Messner Mountain Museum Corones is surrounded by the alpine peaks of the Zillertal, Ortler and Dolomites. Established by renowned climber Reinhold Messner, the sixth and final Messner Mountain Museum explores the traditions, history and discipline of mountaineering.

During construction, 4,000 cubic metres of earth and rock were excavated and then replaced above and around the completed structure (Image courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects)

During construction, 4,000 cubic metres of earth and rock were excavated and then replaced above and around the completed structure (Image courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects)

Opened in July this year, Messner's vision for a museum submerged into the peak of Mount Kronplatz detailed three very specific locations of where the museum should emerge from ground: "In the first, a window looking out southwest to the peak of the Peitlerkofel mountain; in the second, another window should look south toward the Heiligkreuzkofel peak; in the third, a balcony should face west to the Ortler and South Tyrol," he says.

Informed by the shards of rock and ice of the surrounding landscape, concrete canopies have been cast in-situ and rise from the ground to protect the museum's entrance, viewing windows and terrace. Messner adds: "The museum is a mirror of the world of my childhood — the Geislerspitzen, the central buttress of the Heiligkreuzkofel (the most difficult climb in my whole life) and the glaciated granite mountains of the Ahrn Valley."

This is an excerpt from the "Up Where the Air is Thin” article from the December 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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