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Make It Modular

by Sophie Cullen on Aug 11, 2015 in Architecture
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The winning design by Sharon Tsoi Yuk Ying and Horace Yeung Chi,
entitled Multi-Variate House, reflects the classical yet modern style that Timothy Oulton is renowned for

The winning design by Sharon Tsoi Yuk Ying and Horace Yeung Chi, entitled Multi-Variate House, reflects the classical yet modern style that Timothy Oulton is renowned for

2015 saw the first collaboration between Timothy Oulton, Halo Creative & Design and the Hong Kong Design Institute (HKDI) as they launched the 'Modular by Timothy Oulton' competition

The best architecture and design firms know that to be at the top of their game, they need to recognise changing trends and address them before they occur. They also realise the benefits of harnessing multigenerational talent when attempting to answer these questions. So when international companies Timothy Oulton and Halo Creative & Design wanted to further consider changes in modern housing through modular construction, they decided to offer an opportunity to students in their second year of the higher diploma in architectural design at the Hong Kong Design Institute (HKDI) to help them expand their vision.

Competition winners Sharon Tsoi Yuk Ying and Horace Yeung Chi with Timothy Oulton

Competition winners Sharon Tsoi Yuk Ying and Horace Yeung Chi with Timothy Oulton

A modular home is one that is assembled in a factory and then transported to site. Benefits of building in such a way include increased speed of construction, flexibility of design, energy efficiency and a noticeably favourable price tag. "It's largely about economics. I think, where we are at the moment, building costs in the western world are so exorbitant that to achieve anything now, we have to look at all the tricks we can, so modularisation is one of them," explains Simon Laws, in-house architect for Timothy Oulton. "Building things in factories and modularising and standardising them allows us the potential to create a different kind of space."

Apart from seeing their structure created by the Timothy Oulton studio, the winners also had the opportunity to engage in an exclusive in-store event with industry professionals such as Simon Laws and Bastien Taillard from Timothy Oulton

Apart from seeing their structure created by the Timothy Oulton studio, the winners also had the opportunity to engage in an exclusive in-store event with industry professionals such as Simon Laws and Bastien Taillard from Timothy Oulton

For the competition, dubbed Modular by Timothy Oulton, the brief for the 20 students was to create an attractive modular home which reflected the neo-vintage design elements of the brand while ultimately being a prefabricated house. The organisers wanted to keep a certain element of reality in the project and specified that all the materials for the build must be affordable, honest and able to be transported in a shipping container.

This is a preview of the “Make it Modular" article from the August 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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