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Lemongrass restaurant by Einstein & Associates

by Sophie Cullen on Nov 12, 2015 in Architecture
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The rooftop area centres around a long communal bar area and incorporates an array of
colours and materials (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

The rooftop area centres around a long communal bar area and incorporates an array of colours and materials (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

Einstein & Associates has created a restaurant in Bogor, Indonesia, which balances bold colours amid a natural, modern setting

Just 60 kilometres south of the Indonesian capital of Jakarta, Bogor is a city famed for its historic botanic gardens and its presidential palace. During the Dutch colonial era, it served as the summer residence of the Governor General of East Indies and was known as Buitenzorg, meaning 'without a care' in Dutch. Taking inspiration from the tropical paradise that the city is known for being, Einstein & Associates recently completed Lemongrass, a casual dining restaurant that flaunts the colour and beauty of the region.

The feature of the main dining room is undoubtedly the tiled, peacock feather flooring, which also acts as a connecting device between the alfresco area and the interior (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

The feature of the main dining room is undoubtedly the tiled, peacock feather flooring,
which also acts as a connecting device between the alfresco area and the interior (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

Lead architect and designer Leo Einstein Franciscus was tasked with creating a new dining destination for Bogor. One of the biggest challenges of the project was designing a space that echoed the tropical flavour of the area, while ensuring a suitable amount of coverage for diners, as the city is prone to high amounts of rainfall. "I had to think about how to create a layout suitable for when it rains. I wanted to make a tropical paradise which was 60 per cent outdoors, yet the client wanted the entire space enclosed. So the solution was to try and introduce an alfresco element into the restaurant and the response from customers and clients has been excellent," notes Franciscus.

A mixture of natural materials such as stone and wood have been used in the alfresco area to create a welcoming, tropical atmosphere (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

A mixture of natural materials such as stone and wood have been used in
the alfresco area to create a welcoming, tropical atmosphere (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

From the exterior, guests are welcomed by modern tropical architecture with splashes of rich, bold colours and plants designed specifically to blend with the surrounding nature. The architect wanted to create a modern-yet-subtle style through the structure, and employed recycled wood and stones in the exterior facades. With the building itself positioned at the centre of a beautifully designed tropical garden, the plan of Lemongrass is intentionally designed as an open-air and open-plan space, eliminating the boundaries between indoor and outdoor.

The alfresco area offers a range of seating options for guests such as communal sofas or more intimate pods (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

The alfresco area offers a range of seating options for guests such as communal sofas
or more intimate pods (Photography: © William Kalengkongan)

To enter the restaurant, guests approach through a narrow, tropical jungle where the whispering sound of water flowing from the nearby reflective pool can be heard. Inside, the restaurant is divided into four main spaces: the main indoor dining area, alfresco dining, second-floor indoor dining and the rooftop area. The long linear open kitchen welcomes people as they enter the indoor dining area. A striking peacock mosaic floor feature is used at the centre of this space as the connection between the main dining room and the alfresco dining area. Aqua, teal and green hues are set off against natural materials such as wood, stone and terracotta tiles, which have been employed extensively to create a warm and inviting ambience throughout.

This is an excerpt from the “Without a Care" article from the November 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

 

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