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Hugo Kohno Architect Associates design split-family home made of wood

by Hannah Grogan on Aug 16, 2018 in Architecture , Top Story
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Japan-based firm Hugo Kohno Architect Associates has completed a split-level family home in Minamiyukigaya which utilises angles and light to create a sense of space inside the city 

m-yukigaya_03m-yukigaya_01Located in Ota-ku, Tokyo in an alleyway just off a popular shopping street, this property is straddled on the east by a road and on the south by a three-story apartment building.

The building consists of two independent residences—one for a mother and the other for her son and his family. The complex was designed with the possibility and intention that one day, they could be converted into rental units.

Occupying the first floor is the mother, while her son, his wife, and their child are on the second and third floors.

The third floor was handled as a single entity containing private areas such as the master and child's bedrooms and the bathroom. The first floor was also treated as a single volume offset from the third-floor volume so as to open up space for a terrace on the first-floor roof. In between these two sections, the second floor is surrounded by two continuous surfaces that fit together like puzzle pieces, embracing an open living room that is integrated with the terrace.

We used an unusual three-dimensional form to respond to the contradictory demands of complying with building codes related to building height and obstruction of light and views…  effectively bringing light into the living spaces

In order to bring as much light into the first floor as possible despite the apartment building on the south side, the first-floor roof slopes up steeply on that side and has a skylight along the elevated edge.

On the second floor, this slope becomes a slanted wall extending the floor of the roof balcony upwards, thereby blocking visibility from the corridor of the adjacent apartment building. Trees planted along the elevated edge of the roof further shield the home from the third floor of the apartment building and bring dappled light inside, allowing the residents to enjoy the shifting patterns of light and greenery.

“Designing residential architecture in densely developed areas tests our ability as architects to respond both to the surrounding circumstances and the individual needs of the residents,” commented the firm

“In this case, we used an unusual three-dimensional form to respond to the contradictory demands of complying with building codes related to building height and obstruction of light and views, securing adequate privacy and distance from surrounding buildings, and effectively bringing light into the living spaces”. 

Material Information:
Exterior Finish: Galvanised aluminium coated steel sheet, wood, sprayed lysine finish
Floor: Composite flooring
Wall: Acrylic Emulsion Paint Finish
Ceiling: Acrylic Emulsion Paint Finish

Photos: Seiichi Ohsawam-yukigaya_17m-yukigaya_04m-yukigaya_07

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