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by Michele Koh Morollo on Dec 30, 2013 in Architecture , Interiors
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Exclusive and environmentally friendly, Green Village is a dream come true for those looking for their very own green Bali Ha’i

As the creative director of eco-friendly architecture, design and construction firm Ibuku, Bali-born, New York-schooled Canadian Elora Hardy has been making waves with bamboo architecture at Bali’s Green School and Green Village – a recently completed residential development that progressed from the school.

Green Village was designed as an extension of the school, and Elora Hardy (a judge at the Perspective Awards 2011) envisions a community of environmentally conscious children growing up here, close to the Green School campus. Presently home to 280 day and boarding students, the school and village have attracted homeowners from around the globe — as well as famous visitors like Richard Branson.

At present there are seven completed privately-owned villas and eight freehold and leasehold plots. Once a plot is purchased, Hardy and her team of Balinese architects — Defit Wijaya, Nyoman Kerta, Putra Wirasa, Eka Wiradana, Ali Faquih — will design a customised home to suit the personality and tastes of its owner.

Located in Sibang, an area between Denpasar and Ubud, the villas of Green Village sit on the outskirt of a local village along the terraced slope of the Ayung River valley, nestled amidst lush tropical rainforests. Unlike anything one might find in a modern city, the homes of Green Village are inspired by forms in nature and follow the inherent strengths and versatility of bamboo. Elements of Asian architecture like traditional Sumatran Minang roofs and spinning circular ‘moon’ doors that evolved from ancient Chinese-style circular doorways can be seen in many of the homes.

Balinese traditional architecture is based on the measurements of the owners’ body. Each new structure built in a Balinese compound is planned using the head of householders’ hand, food, and arm lengths, rather than a common system of measurement. Therefore, each home is intimately connected to the family it belongs to, and to the history and passing generations of the family. “In a more abstract way, we also plan each home at Green Village around the desires, personalities, and habits of the family who will own it,” says Hardy.

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