SEARCH

Architecture in flux

by Peace Chiu on Apr 15, 2015 in Architecture
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on Sina WeiboShare on Tencent WeiboEmail this to someone
With three theatres in the Taipei Performing Arts Centre
consolidated in a single block, each can be used independently or
can benefit from each other through the combination of the three
stages into a colossal mega stage and sharing technologies (Photo courtesy of OMA / ArtefactoryLab)

With three theatres in the Taipei Performing Arts Centre consolidated in a single block, each can be used independently or can benefit from each other through the combination of the three stages into a colossal mega stage and sharing technologies (Photo courtesy of OMA / ArtefactoryLab)

Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas believes that every architectural element is affected by society and changes in society, and that "architectural elements are not necessarily stable; they change, almost as part of fashion"

At Hong Kong's Business of Design Week (BODW) late last year, eminent Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas — hailed as one of the world's 100 Most Influential People by Time magazine in 2008 — took part in a plenary session titled 'Living Design'. Here, he shared his thoughts on how architecture relates to everyday life: "Every architectural element is affected by society and changes in society. Architectural elements are not necessarily stable; they change, almost as part of fashion," Koolhaas said.

Rem Koolhaas (Photo by Fred Ernst / Courtesy of OMA)

Rem Koolhaas (Photo by Fred Ernst / Courtesy of OMA)

Koolhaas, who founded OMA in 1975 together with Elia and Zoe Zenghelis, and Madelon Vriesendorp, has won several international awards including the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2000, the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the 2010 Venice Biennale, the RIBA Charles Jencks Award in 2012, and the Johannes Vermeer Prijs in 2013. During his lecture at BODW 2014, he talked about OMA's Taipei Performing Arts Centre in Taiwan, which is due for completion this year. Unlike most performing arts centres, which have separate auditoriums independent of each other, the Taipei Performing Arts Centre (TPAC) has three theatres consolidated in a single block (as featured in Perspective magazine, September 2013).

Koolhaas explained that this way, each theatre can be used independently or can benefit from each other through the combination of the three stages into a colossal mega stage and the sharing technologies. "Architecture has a good side and a bad side: the good side is enabling things, the bad side is limiting things," he said.

This, in fact, was one of the challenges OMA set for itself in designing TPAC: overcoming architecture's inevitability of imposing limits on what is possible. "In our own works, we should pursue what enables us and keep what limits us to a minimum. We should try to find combinations that offer elements that create more possibilities than the clients can realise."

This is a preview of the “Architecture in flux" article from the April 2015 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

, , , , , , , ,

Recent Posts

  • Lyndon Neri & Rossana Hu_by Jiaxi Yang & Zhu Zhe

    Collaborate for excellence


    Lyndon Neri of Neri&Hu reveals how he and wife Rossana Hu combine a thriving practice with raising three children, and sheds light on the controversy at this year’s Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair

    Posted on Oct 14, 2019
    View
  • law on keyes06_david ross

    Advocacy for women


    South African architect Kate Otten on addressing professional challenges in the country

    Posted on Oct 14, 2019
    View
  • 07_Presse_bauhaus100

    The Spirit of Bauhaus


    The century-old school strongly influenced Hong Kong's cityscape and continues to shape a Gen-Z led future

    Posted on Oct 11, 2019
    View
  • k11 Musea

    Silicon Valley of Culture


    Adrian Cheng's K11 MUSEA is finally open and set to become Hong Kong's 'Silicon Valley of Culture'

    Posted on Sep 19, 2019
    View
Top