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Aedas transforms Temple Mall

by Simon Yuen on Oct 22, 2016 in Architecture
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All images courtesy of Aedas

All images courtesy of Aedas

Located in the bustling residential district of Wong Tai Sin, where the famous temple named for the district is located, a three-decade-old shopping mall was recently renovated by Aedas

In Wong Tai Sin, there are multiple public and private housing estates, accommodating a population of more than 400,000 people. The district is most famous for hosting a place of worship to which locals and tourists flock daily, the Wong Tai Sin Temple — and adjacent to this is a shopping centre called Temple Mall, operated by listed company Link REIT.

Temple Mall, located in Wong Tai Sin and sitting immediately adjacent to the famous Wong Tai Sin Temple and MTR station, features giant lanterns at its entrance plaza which were inspired by the incense spirals commonly found at temples across Hong Kong

Temple Mall, located in Wong Tai Sin and sitting immediately adjacent to the famous Wong Tai Sin Temple and MTR station, features giant lanterns at its entrance plaza which were inspired by the incense spirals commonly found at temples across Hong Kong

Drawing inspiration from the temple which inspired its name, Temple Mall stands four storeys tall and comprises two retail podiums, spanning 47,400 sq-m. Tasked to refurbish it from the inside-out, international architecture and interior design firm Aedas, led by designer Cary Lau, introduced perforated aluminium panels on the building's façade, monogrammed with a twisted, modernised version of the Chinese character '黃', literally translating as 'yellow', which is the first character of the temple and location's names.

Void rings imitating the shape of incense spirals are crafted on the atrium ceiling, extending the oriental style from the exterior to the interior

Void rings imitating the shape of incense spirals are crafted on the atrium ceiling, extending the oriental style from the exterior to the interior

Lit up once darkness falls, the patterns created add to the overall ambience of the area, as does the mall's entrance area, which serves as a key node to lead visitors to the mall from the nearby Wong Tai Sin MTR station, the temple and nearby areas. Here, five spiral lanterns in different sizes appear to float overhead, inspired by the incense spirals which famously adorn Hong Kong's many temples.

This is an excerpt from the “It’s All In A Name" article from the October 2016 issue of Perspective magazine.

To continue reading, get your copy of Perspective.

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