SEARCH

A sinking habitat

by TERESA CHOW on Sep 15, 2011 in Architecture , Interiors
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on Sina WeiboShare on Tencent WeiboEmail this to someone

 Remistudio’s modern version of Noah’s Ark integrates alternative energy and looks beyond glass and concrete in an attempt to answer the challenges of our times

 

For decades now, we have listened to – and, for the most part, ignored – gloom and doom prognostications about global warming, rising sea levels and how the world is basically going to end. But simply brushing aside such warnings as baseless hysteria is getting increasingly difficult in the face of what appears to be a rising number of unprecedented natural disasters: tsunamis, earthquakes, super-hurricanes, severe drought, crippling blizzards and so on.

As it becomes increasingly apparent that it is time for mankind to rethink its relationship with – and effect on – nature, the civil role of architects has become crucial. And instead of simply reactionary measures, we need to start thinking about preparing in advance, with homes and structures which are enduring and life-sustaining in the face of natural and human disasters.

Meet Alexander Remizov, head of Russia-based Remistudio, an architecture firm which focuses heavily on sustainable design. In response to the recent International Union of Architects (UIA) work programme on Architecture for Disaster Relief, Remizov devised a solution: a futuristic, bioclimatic building, supported by independent life-support systems.

Designed to withstand natural forces such as floods, earthquakes and tornadoes, The Ark has the potential to become one of the greatest architectural developments of our time if investment is secured to turn the project into reality. 

 Read the full story in the October 2011 issue of Perspective magazine! 

 

Recent Posts

  • Wanchai – the gentrification of Hong Kong

    Making a meal of it


    In the rush to gentrify parts of Hong Kong, essential elements of the city’s vibrant nature are being lost, John Batten explains

    Posted on Sep 19, 2018
    View
  • DSC_0060

    Voices heard


    Perspective sits down with RIBA chief executive Alan Vallance and director of international relations Azlina Bulmer

    Posted on Sep 14, 2018
    View
  • marshall blecher

    Drift wood


    The Copenhagen Islands project, an archipelago of nine, has been introduced as a floating public park concept

    Posted on Sep 4, 2018
    View
  • DSC_2634

    Dream catcher


    Morpheus Macau is the latest hotel to join the country's City of Dreams resort complex with a remarkable exo-skeletal architecture designed by Zaha Hadid

    Posted on Sep 3, 2018
    View
Top