• SUBSCRIBE NOW
SEARCH

A CUT & A CAPPUCCINO

by Mavis Wong on May 11, 2012 in Architecture , Interiors , Lifestyle
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on Sina WeiboShare on Tencent WeiboEmail this to someone

A brand new salon/café in Hong Kong means you can now get a haircut and a coffee in a seamless blend of spaces

Having your hair cut can often be a chore – and, occasionally, it can also be a long, painful process if you’re out of luck. At Café Salon, a crossover concept store ingeniously combining a café and salon, however, the experience becomes a escape of the best kind. A cosy, two-storey space, the salon is a welcoming space which invites you to chill out and enjoy a brew before, during and after your hair cut.

Hong Kong-based Wall Studio – the team behind the spatial design – gives us a look behind the scenes of the creation of this ingenious and unlikely spot in the midst of the hustle and bustle of Central.

What was your vision for Café Salon?
Drawing upon a primary principle of creating a diversified space for customers to enjoy coffee and hair services at the same time, the whole space is fused with the unique characteristics of both café and salon. Thus, Café Salon is a seamless blend of the two brands, Essensuals (Toni&Guy’s young line) and Pacific Coffee Company, reflected in the collage design strategy.

How did the collage-theme design link the two floors, which needed to fulfil different functions?
We capitalised the spatial quality of the two levels and the diversity of customer interactions by irregularly dividing the whole space into different scenarios in a collage effect. Elements of the salon and café are subtly integrated, thus creating a harmonious effect.

The storefront looks like a collage too…
Yes. From the huge rustic iron structure that divides the building façade to the unpolished external walls and the random arrangement of spotlights, the collage concept extends from the interior to the storefront.

How does your design connect the store to the streetscape?
At ground level, we deliberately created a semi-open area to reinforce the interaction between the inside and outside of the store. Together with the plant wall, the whole layout contributes to an interesting contrast to the busy street.

Are there any common features on both floors?
There are display racks on both floors showcasing both coffee products and salon information. This allows customers to learn about the latest hair trends while enjoying their time in the café downstairs – or enjoy a cup of coffee when having a haircut in the salon upstairs.

What about the spaces in between?
The two floors are linked by an internal iron staircase, which is adorned with Plumen pendant lights and treads made of burned logs. Although the café and salon are located on different floors, they’re closely connected – there is also a café area on the upper level.

Tell us more about the salon on the second floor.
The collage concept of the lower level further permeates upstairs. Instead of solid walls, we used irregular display racks to divide the space into different zones – not only does this create a more spacious area, but it also provides a place to showcase coffee and salon products.

The furnishings looks lovely…
We tailor-designed unique furniture and lightings, such as the two-in-one coffee table/chair set, chairs made out of wooden box and solid wood bar stools. There are surprises everywhere – from burned log treads to the ceramic pot-turned-chandeliers and sinks made of iron buckets.

Café Salon is at 86 Wellington Street, Central, Hong Kong; tel. +852 3514 4161



Recent Posts

  • Main photo updated

    Incubation architecture


    BARRIE HO Architecture hosts exhibitions about incubation architecture at the Royal Institute of British Architects, London – and soon in Hong Kong

    Posted on Sep 21, 2017
    View
  • Frank Leung surveys his creation at ArtisTree

    Dramatic art


    Hong Kong art space ArtisTree transformed into a dynamic open-box concept performance venue

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
  • 1

    Land Lord


    Landscape designer and architect Raddle Siddeley on why landscapes should look great naked

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
  • Square and boxy, internally House W tells a story of soaring ceilings, vast skylights and an entire wall composed of glass panels on the garden elevation

    Heat exchange


    House W in Beijing overcomes challenges of heat insulation for maximum energy efficiency

    Posted on Sep 19, 2017
    View
Top